Archives: Guy Knowledge

The right way to roll up your sleeves

As a kid, I would roll up my sleeves sometimes to signify that “I was getting down to business.” As I grew older, the simple act of rolling my shirt sleeves up became more functional and even stylish. And of course, there are many times throughout the day when you get too warm, need to get your hands dirty, or you simply want to roll up your sleeves.

Today, I consider myself a bit of a shirt roll aficionado. While there is no one right way to roll up your sleeves, I do believe there are methods that not only look better, but work best in specific situations. So, with this article, I have outlined three simple methods which will help you to roll up your sleeves properly and with some style!

Let’s get started.

Method #1: Casual Roll

This is the most common roll and most likely what you have been doing already. This type of roll is best for casual dress, when you get warm and need to quickly and simply roll up your sleeves. This roll also involves very few folds which will cut down on wrinkles.

  1. Unbutton both the cuff button and the gauntlet button (the button midway up the forearm) and flip the cuff back evenly so that it is inside out.
  2. Using the cuff as a measuring point, fold the cuff back so that it is neatly tucked behind a band of shirt fabric.
  3. That’s it! Now neatly tuck the corners of the cuff and make sure that each roll is even for a uniform look and feel.

step 1 casual sleeve roll casual2

Method #2: Basic Roll

This is your standard military roll. It is clean, simple and great for physical labor.

  1. Unbutton both the cuff button and the gauntlet button and flip the cuff back evenly so that it is inside out.
  2. Using the cuff as a measuring point, fold the cuff back so that it is neatly tucked behind the a band of shirt fabric just like in the Casual Roll.
  3. Repeat this until you roll it past your elbow. (If you have a narrow fitting sleeve, performing this roll before you put the shirt on will help). Be sure that the roll is even and uniform.

Basic Roll basic2

Method #3: Master Roll

This roll takes a little more work to figure out, but it is great for showing off the inner contrast of your cuff and for those looking for added style.

  1. Unbutton both the cuff button and the gauntlet button and flip the cuff back evenly so that it is inside out.
  2. Pull the flipped cuff (don’t roll) up your arm until the sleeve is about an inch beyond your elbow.
  3. Now, roll the sleeve upward to cover the cuff. (Double check that this step is done evenly to avoid pinching).
  4. Cover or reveal as much of the cuff as you like. To undo the fold, simply pull the cuff down.

master1Master Roll

Wrap up

While there is certainly no right or wrong way to roll up your sleeves, it is fun to play around with different styles and do something different. Give each of these methods a try sometime and let us know how it goes when you see us next!

By Brett Wagner

What is a men’s clothier?

When you start to think about it, you begin to realize just how many different ways there are to say “store that sells clothes for men.”  There’s men’s store, men’s clothing, men’s attire, men’s dresswear, etc. But what you don’t see very often, maybe you’ve only seen it at Bespoke Edge, is men’s clothier.

Is there a difference? Absolutely.

Yesterday, I met with one of my adopted mentors who I think really summed it up nicely. He said that a true men’s clothier will always ensure that his/her clients get exactly what they wanted. They will always go the extra mile, they will overdeliver on their client’s needs, and be right there with them during the entire process of buying clothes. Bespoke or otherwise.

A clothing salesperson, on the other hand, is there to make a sale and that’s it.

I think that this terminology is extremely important in the growing industry of custom clothing. Specifically, with bespoke suiting, where there are often second fittings and minor adjustments downstream, you will need a clothier who understands every single step of the process in and out and can guide you along the way. And you should feel confident that they won’t cut corners at your expense.

A clothier is focused first and foremost on service and the client’s experience. The product sold is a natural outcome of this effort.

From a business perspective, clothiers believe that it’s a safe bet that if your experience was excellent, your needs delivered on and then some, and you had fun throughout the process, then you’ll likely be back again.

So, whether you shop with us or someone else, be sure you ask them:

Are you a clothier?

By Ryan Wagner

Why corozo buttons are my new favorite

corozo buttons scottsdale suit

If you’ve shopped with us before, you’ll know that aside from offering an enormous collection of suit and shirt fabrics, we carry an impressive amount of buttons. Not just different colors, but different materials like metallic and rubber buttons. But there’s one particular type that I think is really quite cool: Corozo buttons.

These buttons are made from the corozo nut, or tagua nut. This is the seed of a tropical palm known scientifically as the phytelephas macrocarpas. It’s found throughout Northern South America and parts of Panama.

The fruit of this palm is huge, about a foot across. Each fruit is made up of clusters of seeds with cavities that fill with a white, ivory-like fluid that over time, will harden. Out of this hardened substance, local peoples would fashion figurines or buttons.

Modern manufacturing methods have pushed the corozo material to its limits. It can be cut, machined, heated, bleached, and polished to a finish that I think is even more impressive than ivory. Corozo buttons are also relatively scratch resistant, have a beautiful natural grain, and resist fading.

There’s a lot to like. Plus, they are completely all natural.

custom suits phoenix unique buttons

In particular, I think these buttons are a good match for many of our Scottsdale custom suit clients because the corozo palm is a nod to the warm environment. And in Denver, the natural aesthetic and unique grain of a corozo button pairs nicely for anyone wanting to build a more natural suit.

Speaking of custom suits, let’s take a step back and talk about these buttons – or any luxury button, for that matter – in the context of a shirt or suit. Any sort of high-end button is going to add some subtle style to your outfit. I say subtle, because after all, they are just buttons. They won’t be noticed much until someone gets close enough to see them.

custom suits scottsdale unique corozo buttons

However, you’ll certainly notice them because of the way that they feel. It’s difficult to describe, you really just need to see them in person.

I think that the real beauty in these buttons is that the corozo option is yet another way to build a suit with a nod to luxury craftsmanship. To wear something that tells a story. When done properly, a bespoke suit is a work of art. Paying careful attention to the suit’s details makes for a well-rounded garment.

By Ryan Wagner

corozo buttons

Images courtesy of Corozo Buttons.

How to keep your dress shirts looking like new

dress shirts looking like new

I received a question recently on how to keep your dress shirts looking like new. The more I thought about it, I realized that this is really an important question.

When you first receive a bespoke dress shirt, whether it’s from Bespoke Edge or another provider, there’s no doubt that it looks pretty phenomenal in the box. The fabric is even better looking than the swatch had you seen and the collar looks immaculate in its crispness. You almost don’t want to take it out of the box!

Of course, you eventually do.

And if you wash your shirts at home there’s always that sad moment when you open the washer door and see your once proud dress shirt now in a wrinkled and damp pile of itself.

Sigh.

But shirts are shirts and they are meant to be washed. They’ll be fine. They will shrink a little bit, but if they are one of our shirts, I can say confidently that they will shrink just as planned. For instance, when we took your measurements to build the shirt in the first place, we accounted for a little shrinkage in the sleeves. So, your shirt will fit better and better after the first several wash cycles.

What if you have your bespoke shirts professionally cleaned? Is there anything you should know? Or directions that should be relayed to your cleaner so that your shirts come back looking like new?

First, a high quality bespoke shirt will last a long time and look nice, even after repeated washings. In my experience, skilled launderers are very hard to come by. All too often, cleaners will abuse the shirts with overly high temperatures and harsh pressing. But a good cleaner will employ hand methods where appropriate and use gentle techniques. It wouldn’t hurt to get in the habit of asking your cleaner how they go about washing your shirt and what options are available to you. At the very least, you’ll learn something new.

dress shirts looking like new

Secondly, use a very light starch on any bespoke shirt – you may be surprised how little you actually need.

And don’t dry clean your shirts, just launder them. Washing dress shirts in water is definitely going to be better for removing water soluble dirt and stains. It will also put less wear and tear on your shirts.

Before you exclaim that “…I don’t want to iron! Dry cleaning is so much easier,” you may want to ask your cleaner if they press laundered shirts. This way you get the best of both worlds – appropriate and effective shirt cleaning and no ironing (Oh, and for far less money than having your shirts dry cleaned).

The above tips will help you keep your custom dress shirts looking great, but if I had to highlight one point, it would be the pressing. This is probably the single most important thing you can do to keep your dress shirts looking like new. Whether you’re a skilled ironer or prefer to send your shirts out, be sure to pay special attention to the collar, yoke, and placket of the shirt. If these three areas are looking great, so will you.

By Ryan Wagner

Further reading

Here’s an article on how to wash your dress shirt from our Learn page.