Archives: suit guide

The Bespoke Edge Signature Suit

wedding-suit

Many guys choose to have a bespoke suit made for them because they want that perfect fit. Tailored specifically to their body type, a bespoke suit is truly one of a kind. But one of the great things about choosing to go custom is having control over the details. Working button holes on the cuffs, custom linings, accent button holes, the list goes on and on. Naturally, we at The Bespoke Edge have had a little fun with our own suits and have decided to inaugurate a new suit. We’ve taken our favorite details and married them to an avant-garde suit style that will be sure to turn heads in the Denver area.

Here’s how it works:

  1. You choose the fit. Relaxed or tapered (or really slim!), the features outlined below will work for everyone.
  2. The fabric is also entirely up to your choosing.
  3. Construction can be full canvas, fused, whatever you like.

What follows below is really just us doing what we do best – designing for you a great looking suit.

Gentlemen, presenting the affectionately named Bespoke Edge Signature Suit:

  • Two button

A two button suit is your best bet these days. Specifically, we recommend a low two button cut. This features a higher arm hole and slightly lowered button stance. This will create a more flattering V-shape in the torso. And don’t button the bottom button!

  • Flat Front Pants

Remember when pleats were all the rage? I do. I also remember using my Walkman at about the same time. Today things are different. Pleats are out and flat front trousers are in. You’re not a grandpa yet, so save the pleats for down the road. Basically, the reasons pleats have gone the way of the dinosaur is that suits have slimmed down in the past ten years or so. With a slim suit comes neat and clean lines.

  • Vents

Here, we get a little opinionated. There are basically two choices on vents – single or side vents. Some will argue the very sharp look of double vents (one vent on either side of the suit jacket) and the British heritage, whereas a single vent down the middle is more Italian-leaning. Despite a heated internal debate here at BE, we’ve settled on the single vent for our signature suit.

  • Cuffs

If you follow us on Facebook you probably saw this coming a mile away – working button holes! Surgeon cuffs, as they were originally named, arose because doctors would routinely roll up their sleeves (yes, they wore suits to work) prior to surgery. Off-the-rack suits almost never have working button holes. This is because if you had to change the sleeve length, you’re out of luck. With bespoke, on the other hand, that’s not a problem. Therefore, it’s only appropriate that we feature working button holes on this suit. And three, not four. Why? Well, when was the last time you saw a suit with 3 buttons on the sleeve?

Working button holes

Never owned a suit with working buttons on the cuff? There is a certain luxury that comes with leaving the last button undone. Also, what a perfect place for an accented thread color on the button hole stitching – bright red perhaps?

  • Lapel

In a prior blog, I discussed the pros and cons of each lapel type – notched versus peaked. I argued that when shopping for your first suit, always go with a notched lapel versus peaked, purely because of the versatility afforded with this design.

Notched Lapel

  • Lining

When you shop for an off-the-rack suit you are stuck with whatever boring and completely uninteresting lining comes with the suit. Sure, you could find a skilled tailor to replace the lining, but the cost will be very high. It is far easier to have suit built for you and pick out a lining at the beginning. Here’s the lining we like:

Red lining

A little flash of color that is subtle enough for your Fort Collins office yet hints in the other direction when you go out for a drink.

The paisley pattern is very sophisticated and may sometimes be construed as formal, but the red hue carries a modern look.

Wrap up

And there you have it. We have picked out our favorite details that will take your suit to the next level. All you need now is a custom dress shirt to match!

Whether your office is in Fort Collins, Denver, Boulder or somewhere in between, you’ll be leveraging the most bang for your buck and have a stylish suit that is not only modern, but truly bespoke.

By Ryan Wagner

Notched lapel versus peaked lapels

peaked lapel suit

When shopping for a suit, one of the first big decisions you’ll need to make is whether you want a notched lapel or peaked lapel. Understanding the differences between the two options, and more importantly, what occasions call for which lapel style, can help you to build the suit that’s right for you.

Notched lapel or peaked lapel?

So, what exactly are the differences? And when should you wear one over the other? First, a little background: For those that may need a refresher, the lapel of a man’s suit is the folded flap of cloth on a jacket. Typically, it is formed by folding over the front edges of the jacket and sewing to the collar. There are actually (3) types of lapels – notched, peaked, and shawl. The latter is basically what you see on a dinner jacket (aka tuxedo). Since the dinner jacket is in a world all its own, this blog will focus on the two most common lapels, the notched lapel and peaked lapel.

notched lapel vs peaked lapel

The Notched Lapel

The notched lapel is the venerable standard in men’s suiting. It’s traditional yet contemporary and will be found on jackets ranging from your weekend sportcoat to your go-to business suit. By definition, the notched lapel is categorized by a ‘notch’ where the jacket collar meets the lapel at a 75 – 90 deg angle. If you have one suit, make it a notched lapel, simply because this style is the most versatile. You can wear it to work, to the bar, to an interview, just about anywhere you like.

If you are used to buying off-the-rack suits then you’ve probably owned all notched lapel suits. On the other hand, with bespoke suiting, you have the choice. You may even adjust the size of the notch. For instance, a slimmer lapel demands a very subdued notch, whereas a wider lapel has more room for creativity.

An example of a notched lapel suit

Tip: If you only need one suit, make it a notched lapel, but go with a dark charcoal or near-black fabric selection. This way, you can still navigate a formal event when paired with a black silk tie and white pocket square.

Body type considerations? None at all. As a testament to the versatility of this lapel, all guys can make this look good.  A notched lapel will even take you to some rather elegant occasions. However, if the event is significantly formal or if you are shopping for a double breasted suit, you better consider the alternative – the peaked lapel.

The Peaked Lapel

A peaked lapel is defined by the lapel edges pointing up and towards the shoulder. Traditionally, this lapel was seen in very formal garments like the morning coat or the tailcoat. In modern times this look is (unfairly?) constrained to the realm of executive offices and formal events. You can’t really dress down a peaked lapel. Whether it’s on a double breasted suit or not, you’ll stand out from the crowd. If you choose to widen the lapel and then go peaked, well, now you are really making a statement.

Regardless, don’t shy away from the peaked look. Yes, it’s generally a more formal look than the notched lapel, but is there anything wrong with dressing up? Of course not! Aside from turning some heads at a wedding you’ll look great in your Denver office. Read: dark pin-striped, peaked lapel suit, striped tie, & a great pocket square.

Tip: If you are a shorter guy looking to gain a few virtual inches, give this lapel a try. Similar to the effect of wearing a slim suit, a peaked lapel will induce a lengthening effect by moving the eyes upward towards the shoulders. Larger guys may also employ this technique to lose a few virtual pounds by appearing taller. Wear a dark suit and the effect is amplified.

custom peaked lapel suit

So, what’s the best lapel for you? In summary, there are a couple of general rules:

  1. Notched lapel – business and everyday wear
  2. Peaked lapel – formal and bold

Besides that, it’s really up to you. A man’s style is all about knowing the rules and then bending them just far enough to match your personality. And remember, good fashion is about wearing what makes you feel confident.

So, the next time you’re building a suit, keep in mind what the lapel style says about the occasion. Like so many things in men’s fashion, understanding the subtleties will make it easy to be the best dressed man around!

By Ryan Wagner

About Bespoke Edge: BE is a leading men’s custom clothier, serving the Denver and Scottsdale area by appointment.

Was this article helpful? We sure hope so. At BE, we’re on a mission to become the best brand in menswear. It’s a lofty goal, but everyday we get closer. Please consider signing up for our twice-monthly newsletter – blog post updates and practical style tips. Sign up is near the top of the page! Thank you!

Related articles

All about pick stitching

When to wear a pocket square